Redefining Indigenous cinema

Oftentimes, with Indigenous stories on screen, there is the burden of sliding in decades of context into a film. The effects of colonialism to current day systemic racism, and everything in-between, often seeps into films created and written by us. Indigenous filmmakers have to consider who their audience is – someone who inherently knows this history, or someone brand new, which shifts the approach. Must they explain XYZ in an organic way or will it drag out the story they came to tell?

Indigenous Filmmaking Now: An Overview

Although Canada’s media establishment may claim things are better, where are the opportunities for Indigenous film and TV creatives this year and next? It’s still a tough slog as a producer or filmmaker to receive funding, get opportunities to be employed in higher and mid-level positions where the decisions are made, or to have any control. There are success stories, but many Indigenous filmmakers in documentary, film, and TV are struggling to get the support they need from the major Canadian funding bodies.

The Hollow

This two-season Netflix series from the Vancouver-based Slap Happy Cartoons animation studio kicks off with three teen characters waking up in a bunker with no memories, and no exit. The Hollow is a fast-paced adventure mystery revolves around the teens, Mira, Kai and Adam (all voiced by Canadian actors), facing obstacles like mutant wolves and witches, while unravelling the questions they have about who they are, how they got there, and if they know one another.
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